Top 7 Real Security Threats You Face

March 23rd, 2017 by TCC No comments »

 2017 Security Predictions – The Threats Are Real

While 2016 was a banner year for cyberattacks, hold onto your boots, 2017 should be a wild ride as well. We’ll see escalations of current threats and brand new attack vectors.

  • Will the first ever Ransomworm spread through networks like wildfire?
  • Will your IoT device become the de facto target for zombie botnets?
  • Nation-state hacking and the Cyber Cold War have gone mainstream following the recent U.S Presidential election, and the public’s’ interest is at an all-time high.
  • Will we see the first civilian casualty in the Cyber Cold War?

Find out what WatchGuard’s Chief Technology Officer, Corey Nachreiner, thinks are the top 7 threats we face in 2017.

Check out the infographic to see the top 7 threats we face.


Source: 2017 Security Predictions (Infographic)

Future-Proof Ideas for Websites

March 15th, 2017 by TCC No comments »

When you’re talking about the future it’s hard not to get carried away. The future of almost everything seems exciting. Futuristic cars, houses, television, and of course, websites, will seemingly be able to perform almost any function, thanks to creativity and advances in technology.

But instead of focusing on the technology side of the future, focus on the human side. Human behavior is a more consistent bet than technology. If we prepare our website for the future with human nature in mind, we will put our organization in a good position regardless of how the flood of technology leaves things.

Future-proof ideas for websites

If we bet on technology, we can either be really right, or really, really wrong. But if we bet on human nature, we can count on consistency and know that our website is going to be well-positioned for the future.

The website of the future must be:

  • Simple
  • Mobile
  • Fast
  • Human
  • Useful and/or interesting

1. Make it simple

People value simplicity. Every day, more than 100 million pieces of content are shared on Facebook. More than 90 million Tweets are Tweeted. About 50,000 new blogs are created to get stacked on top of the 150 million+ that are already out there. As you read this, some of the 294 billion emails that are sent each day are being written.

We’re in an era of information overload. Our audience members are busy people who are overcommitted *outside* of their Internet lives. It’s a small miracle each time they make it to our sites so we shouldn’t overwhelm them once they get there.

The first step in preparing your website for the future happens offline. Websites are often a reflection of the organization that created them. If our organization is disorganized, and poor at communicating, our website will be, too. Design by committee often results in a battlefield of compromise where your visitor is the casualty. As an organization, we must go through the difficult task of truly answering some basic but powerful questions:

  • What kind of person is my audience member?
  • What’s the one thing they actually want from me?
  • What one action do I want them to take?

There are no Swiss army-knife sites We need to simplify, specialize and stick to our core mission or risk becoming irrelevant.

If the future of the web is simplicity, here’s how you can prepare:

  • Boil down your organization’s core offering
  • Conduct a website audit: check for competing initiatives on your own site
  • Check your analytics to see where you are losing visitors

2. Make it portable

People value convenience.

The world is going mobile in a hurry. You’ve heard the stats. By 2015, 63% of U.S. citizens will browse the mobile web. Nearly 150 million people will own smartphones and mobile traffic will increase 26-fold.

Mobile isn’t a trend. Mobile is the trend.

But the web isn’t just going to mobile devices, it’s going to any screen that can present the internet. Think kiosks, augmented-reality digital signage, screens we haven’t thought of yet. The web is going to be portable: found wherever a digital screen exists.

When you’re creating a mobile version of your website (which should be your priority over running out to create a mobile app just to create one), the simplicity you gained in step 1 (“Make it simple) will help pave the way for you to create a simpler menu that satisfies your audience members desires on your site.

To prepare your site for mobile:

  • Start thinking now about how you’d simplify your navigation menu and site content
  • Discontinue developing Flash elements into your website, focus on HTML or JavaScript
  • Focus on mobile-friendly first

3. Make it fast

People hate waiting

Nobody likes to stand in line. Waiting is tough for people. That’s why 40% of web users have abandoned a page after 5 seconds of loading.

Taking the steps to making sure our sites load quickly will have benefits to user experience and SEO. People are more likely to click through more on quickly-loading sites. And Google has mentioned that they take load speed into consideration in their algorithm.

Remember, simple sites load faster. And this is even more true (and more important) in mobile.

To get your site sped up for the future:

  • Check site load speed
  • Create a checklist of tweaks to apply to your current site

4. Make it human

People crave human interaction

We’ve heard the statistics on social media. And to be fair, a lot of organizations are at least trying social media. But the humanization of your website shouldn’t be limited to your social media pre-approved channels.

Social media – or the human element – should be a layer across your digital presence, not channel-based. Humanity evokes emotion from people. Showing the human side of your organization can have many benefits.

For instance, during a Fund donation drive, an A/B split test was conducted to see which donation form was more effective and generating donations. One form had a photo, the other did not. The one with the photo – the human – element – converted 10% better and resulted in $1 million more in donations.

The social side of your organization can come out anywhere you have content. Your email subscription thank you, your administrative copy, your error messages can all incorporate the human element.

For instance, a error message was written in a more human-friendly way and decreased the bounce rate by 66%

If the future of the web is social, here’s how to prepare:

  • Take inventory of your social media outposts: are you acting like a logo or a person?
  • Investigate where your audience socializes online
  • Start monitoring social media to keep tabs on influencers and your audience

5. Be useful or interesting

People love a good story

An article this long has to include the cliché “content is king” at least once so here it is: content is king. In a recent survey, 73% of people said they preferred to learn about organizations through articles as opposed to ads. Content is 61% more likely to drive someone to make a purchase than ads, and content can live forever on your website.

  • The power of a good story is strong.
  • And content can pay dividends down the road for your site. A Tweet or Facebook post usually only lasts for hours. A blog post can last for years.
  • The future of the web is storytelling, so start generating content that captivates your audience because it’s useful or interesting (or both!)
  • If you want to prepare for the future of the web, focus on human nature. Make it simple, portable, fast, social, useful and interesting you’ll be ahead of the race.

Put your website to the test!

30 Second Test – Things to look for:

  • Does your website communicate your message clearly?
  • At the end of the day, what do you want your website to do?
  • Does your website effectively explain your product/service?
  • How do your clients react to your website? Do they like it?
  • What does your sales staff say about your website? Does it help or hurt them?
  • Does your website sell for you the way you want it to?
  • Do you know If people are even using your website?
  • What do visitors do while on your website?
  • Bottom line, all websites have a call-to-action, even if it is to click on the next link or read the next page. Is your call-to-action getting you results?

If one or more of these questions cause you concern, call us today at 1-800-418-2358 and let’s get your website ticking again.

The Computer Company, Inc.
15 Commerce Drive, Cromwell, CT
(860) 635-0500

Turning Small Business into Big Business with eManagerSite

March 1st, 2017 by TCC No comments »

If you’re like most small business owners, you’re constantly fighting 3 battles:

You’ve got too much competition.

There are a limited number of customers out there, and you will need to find them and get them to your website.

You have a budget that is not unlimited.

Basically, this means you have to come up with ways to make your business stand out — all without spending a small fortune. Let the Computer Company review how this can be accomplished.

All you have to do is succeed at content marketing.  Content marketing has become a buzz term lately. However, it’s not some passing fad. Instead, it’s a proven way to turn your small business into a big business. In fact, if you do it correctly, your small business will be right up there with the big boys.

How can you do it?

Whether you have one employee or 1,000 employees, all businesses share one very important responsibility — to make life easier for their customers. Whether you sell websites, sell car parts or dry clean clothes, potential customers want to know how working with you benefits them. By publishing content that showcases your expertise, you can do just that.

Let’s say you run a small business that fixes computers. If you started up a blog that explained ways to prevent spyware from infiltrating people’s hard drives, wrote about the pros and cons of the newest processor to hit the market and gave out tips that could help make computers last longer, anyone who read your blog would see that you really know what you’re talking about. Thus, they’d be a whole lot more likely to call you when their own computer needs a repair.

Some ways to become an expert in a subject would be if you own a small interior design firm, talk to the local hardware store about writing a guest post for their website. If you write about the latest home renovation trend, that’s something that the hardware store’s customers will be interested in and if they want some expert help to tackle any of those projects, they’ll know you can be of service.

Publish truly great content both on your own site and off, and you’ll have more people seeing your name. You’ll have more people linking to your website. You’ll have more people talking about you on Facebook and Twitter. You’ll rank higher in the search results. You’ll make your mark on the Web.

But what about the expense?

Ah yes, the third challenge we talked about. You may be inclined to think that content marketing can only generate big business results if you have big business money to spend. However, nothing could be further from the truth. In fact, content marketing is the ideal choice for small businesses, because you can succeed with virtually any-sized budget. And, the money you spend will provide long-term benefits. Let’s say you publish a great article that offers a detailed analysis of one of the developments in your industry. That article will be on the Web forever meaning that people will be able to read it six hours from now, six months from now and six years from now. It’s common for content marketers to still get traffic from pieces they published months or even years prior. Consider it the gift that keeps on giving.

Even if you pay a professional content writer like the Computer Company  to review or create the article for you, if it’s good enough, it should be able to pay for itself over time. After all, if the article fetches enough extra traffic — and your sales copy is good enough to turn those additional visitors into buyers — the money you spent on it was well worth it. Happy ending for everyone. :)

That’s the exact opposite of paid advertising. If you’ve been spending a chunk of your budget on banner ads, you’re only going to see results for as long as you keep paying the bills. Once you stop forking over your money, those ads are going to disappear. You’ll never be able to benefit from them again, unless of course, you start paying for them again.

When you think about it in terms of dollars and cents — the true benchmark for any business — you just can’t beat content marketing. It’s the perfect way to give small businesses a bigger reach and a bigger slice of the pie.

Contact us today for a free evaluation of your website and get some ideas that can make your business money and for you to be successful

Computer Company

Telephone: 800 418 2358

The Best Cyber Security Advice from Experts.

February 22nd, 2017 by TCC No comments »

Some great advice from PC World Online.

  1. Set up two-factor authentication to protect their internet accounts, especially email. It can be particularly useful when stopping hackers who are trying to steal login passwords from users, whether through malware or email phishing schemes.
  2. Businesses need to first think about what assets they’re trying to protect from cyber threats, as opposed to blindly buying the latest security products.
  3. Many people still think hackers will never target them, but that assumption is wrong. Everybody’s information is valuable.
  4. When a company gets hacked, it’s largely because there’s a computer, a box, a website that they didn’t know they owned.

Read the full article here:

http://www.pcworld.com/article/3171280/security/experts-at-rsa-give-their-best-cybersecurity-advice.html

 

Think Your Computer Might have a Virus?

February 15th, 2017 by TCC No comments »

Yes… It happens. How can you be sure though?

We found this great article on the Kaspersky website and we thought we would share it with you this week. Here it is:

There is a number of signs or symptoms indicating that your computer is infected.

If you have started to notice weird things happening on your PC, such as:

  • unusual messages, images, or sound signals;
  • CD-ROM tray opens and closes voluntary;
  • programs start running without your command;
  • messages are displayed informing that one of your programs is attempting to access the Internet without your command.

Then it is likely that your computer is infected with malware.

Additional signs of email infections:

  • Your friends or colleagues tell you about having received emails sent from your email box which you did not send;
  • A lot of messages without a sender address and subject in your mailbox.
  • It must be admitted that such signs are not always explained by presence of malware. They may have some other explanation. For example, the issue with weird emails may be the result of somebody sending infected emails with your sender address from some other computer, not necessarily yours.

Read the rest at: http://support.kaspersky.com/us/790

Guest Wi-Fi Can Measurably Improve Customer Engagement for Brick and Mortar Businesses

December 19th, 2016 by TCC No comments »

guest wifi brick and mortar
Brick and mortar companies that want to access the same level of customer insights as online shops need look no further than their own Wi-Fi networks. Advancements in Wi-Fi engagement and analytics tools can unlock goldmines of data on customer behavior, preferences and sentiment to support businesses’ marketing and sales programs.

Online shopping for retailers, mobile ordering for dining franchises, and online booking and mobile check-in and out for hotels. These are just a few examples of ways brick and mortar businesses have lost a direct connection with their customers. Unlike online businesses, organizations with physical locations haven’t traditionally had access to data on traffic, conversions and other analytics to help optimize their marketing and sales programs. However, since the vast majority of the world now carries a Wi-Fi-enabled device at all times, brick and mortar business can access all kinds of invaluable information on shopper, guest and employee behavior.

With the right Wi-Fi management tools, store-provided wireless access can help businesses successfully carry out initial engagement, engagement analytics and targeted marketing. Following are a few examples of in-store marketing powered by Wi-Fi….

Read whole articel by  https://www.secplicity.org/2016/10/18/guest-wi-fi-can-measurably-improve-customer-engagement-brick-mortar-businesses/

 

In a plugged-in region, Connecticut sees few data centers

December 9th, 2016 by TCC No comments »

 

The Computer Companies Data Center located in Cromwell, CT

As the digital age gives way to more and more users demanding fast, powerful and reliable computing, the business of commercial data centers is benefiting from that surge.

The facilities are the backbone of data-driven industries like finance, technology and government. More recently, they have become known for being the underlying apparatuses behind high-frequency trading, the focus of the latest book by journalist Michael Lewis and the talk of Wall Street last week. By strategically placing their servers in the same data centers used by exchanges like the New York Stock Exchange, high-frequency traders receive market information milliseconds faster than average investors. Known as co-location, the practice more broadly (and benignly) refers to businesses renting space under a shared roof for servers and other hardware.

All told, there are 2,651 colocation centers in the United States, according to Datacenters.com, a website that tracks the growth of data centers across the globe. About 20 percent, or 555, can be found in the Northeast. Within the region, New York leads the way with 188 data centers, followed by New Jersey with 100. Further north, Massachusetts has 96.

Connecticut trails behind with only 17 colocation data centers, a surprisingly small number given Fairfield County’s position in the financial services industry, and the number of mid-sized companies that would rather co-locate than build their own data centers.

Stunting growth

According to a CB Richard Ellis report published last July, the four main drivers that determine where data center operators elect to locate are: access to electricity and telecommunications, geography and climate. Those factors being equal, the decision rests on cost of real estate, taxes and economic incentives. The report notes that New York and New Jersey are among the 11 states that do not automatically levy taxes on equipment and furniture.

In the case of New York, the state wields as much as $10 million in incentives for data centers that agree to cut down on their usage, as part of an energy savings program in an industry notorious for electricity hogging.

Bruce Carlson, the acting president and CEO of the Connecticut Technology Council, said he believed the state’s lack of competitiveness boiled down to a question of priorities.

Among the often-cited observations, the industry is not a driver of employment.

But given the increasing number of firms relying on technology, he said it might be worth considering the value of data centers to the state economy.

The Computer Companies Data Center is uniques in that it is a SSAE16 Type II

A data center with a SSAE16 Type II, stands out from other data centers. (Formerly called SAS 70 Type II Certification)

SSAE16 Type II, (formerly SAS 70 Type II Certification) is a widely recognized auditing standard developed by the American Institute of Certified Public Accountants (AICPA).  By obtaining a SSAE16 Type II, (formerly SAS 70 Type II Certification) an auditor is attesting that an organization underwent a thorough examination process which audited their control objectives (the IT functions that protect the confidentiality, integrity and availability of data).

How can you be sure the data center that is storing your critical information is providing the necessary controls to safeguard that data? We live in a global economy with fierce competition. A SSAE16 Type II, (formerly SAS 70 Type II Certification) is one method of ensuring best practices are implemented to comply with industry standards.

There are two types of SSAE16 Type II, (formerly SAS 70 Type II Certification) reports.

  • SSAE16 Type I, (formerly SAS 70 Type I Certification) report is use by the auditor to express an opinion on whether the controls put in place were a fair representation of the organizations description of those controls and whether they functionally achieved the specified objectives.
  • SSAE16 Type II, (formerly SAS 70 Type II Certification) report includes the information in the Type I report and also elaborates on whether the controls were implemented effectively during the audit period. The auditor determines whether the controls were implemented effectively by physically evaluating the facility, interviewing personnel, examining audit trails, and other practices.

A consistent supply of power is critical to Data Center operations. We provide this power to independently control uninterruptible power supplies that provide conditioned power to individual racks. The main power is backed up by a natural gas generator fed from a multi-million gallon storage facility located within 1 mile of our facility. In essence, the generator can provide power to the Data Center indefinitely.

The Computer Company’s Data Center is protected by video surveillance which provides 24×7 monitoring of both the interior and exterior of the facility, a security-vestibule (man-trap) prevents unauthorized access to the Data Center floor, and card-key and biometrics provide authorization and authentication. The facility also employs modern environmental controls and FM 200 fire suppression system.

The Computer Company’s top-of-the-line Data Center facility guarantees the power infrastructure that will keep your business up and running with high speed internet access that can handle any bandwidth. Our Data Center customers consistently cite our hosting reliability, flexibility and responsiveness, and staff expertise as the reasons they prefer The Computer Company’s Data Center services.

Call us to find out more about how this service can benefit your business.

800.418.2358

Cromwell Location
15 Commerce Drive
Cromwell, CT 06416
860.635.0500

http://www.computercompany.net/DataCenter.htm

7 Steps to an Effective Email Campaign

November 8th, 2016 by TCC No comments »

Every email your business sends has the potential to build relationships and boost sales. Emanager has created a guide that breaks down seven components of an email. With this handy information, you’ll be on your way to creating successful email campaigns in no time with Emanager.

1. From label

We start with the “from” label. Everyone pays attention to where an email comes from, it’s the first thing a person sees when they scan their inbox. Since this is such an important piece of inbox real estate, you want to make sure that the from label matches your company name, or whoever your recipient signed up to hear from when they subscribed to your list. This helps easily identify an email’s source.

2. Subject line

When an email lands in your inbox, you decide whether or not you’re going to open it in a matter of seconds, right? One of the things you base your decision on is the subject line. Your subscribers do the same. This is why subject lines are so important. You could offer your customers the best deal or information in the world, but if you have a poorly written subject line, your customers won’t get far enough to take advantage of that great deal.

Tips to creating subject lines:

Keep it short. Stick to 40-50 characters. Don’t overuse punctuation (i.e. !!!) or symbols. Don’t use all caps. Don’t repeat the from label. Do make it interesting.

3. Pre-header

The pre-header is like a subject line’s sidekick. It’s the first line of text in your email. Some email programs, like Gmail or mobile phones, include the pre-header after the subject line so the reader can get a little more information before opening the email. See the grey text after the subject line? That’s the pre-header it’s another way to grab attention. Whether it’s displayed next to the subject line or not, that first sentence in your email is vital. You want customers to keep reading. Try to write something that builds on the subject line and tells readers exactly what the email is about.

4. Content

Now it’s time to get to the meat of your email marketing: content. The message that you create should provide value to your customer. Teach them about your business, offer a promotional deal, or keep them informed about new products or services. Whatever your goal is, make sure the content is succinct and informative. To set your emails apart from the rest, make a commitment to quality. Create content your customers want to read and then keep it coming. You want your customers to look forward to your emails. Importantly, every email should be error-free. You don’t want to sink your credibility with an email that’s riddled with misspellings and grammatical errors. You’ll also want to vary the kind of content you send. You can’t fill your customers’ inbox with dozens of promotional emails. If you try to sell too hard, you’ll push customers away. Offer an array of content. It helps the company build a relationship with customers. From product tips to a company newsletter, the name of the content game is diversity.

5. Call to action

The point of every email is to get subscribers to take some kind of action. Whether you want them to make a purchase or take an online survey, a clear call to action makes it easy for the recipient to follow through. When you’re creating an email, ask yourself, “What do I want the recipient to do?” If the answer is to make a purchase, you could include a “Shop Now” button in the email. If you want customers to take a survey, you would include a link that takes the recipient directly to the questionnaire. The main thing to remember when creating the call to action is that it should be clear. We’re talking blatantly obvious. Take a look at this email. The call to action is easy to identify. Recipients click on the “Shop now” button, which takes them directly to the online retail mecca in seconds. One of the best ways to create a clear call to action is to use a clickable button.

Tips to creating a strong call to action:

Keep it short: A call to action should be no more than five words; most are only two words. You want something that’s simple and effective. Use active language: You want customers to act now, not two days from now. Use active words to get your customers moving. Phrases like “Purchase now” or “Try our new service today” are good examples. Create a sense of urgency: Give customers a reason to act now. For instance, put a limited time frame on deals so customers won’t wait.

6. Images

There’s an old saying that a picture is worth a thousand words, and it especially holds true in email marketing. Using an image in an email is a great way to appeal to your customer’s visual nature. One of the easiest ways to incorporate images is to highlight your product or service. This email wouldn’t be nearly as effective without the pictures of the product. The images give customers an idea of what the new product looks like. It’s invaluable information for customers and gives them a reason to shop. If you’re trying to market something that isn’t product-related, such as a service, you have to think outside the box. For instance, think about whom your product or service helps and try to use an image that relates. The image complements the text. That should be your goal.

7. Social media buttons

Don’t forget to include social media buttons in your email. You want your customers to engage with your brand as much as possible, so make it easy for them to check out your feeds. Place the Facebook, Twitter and YouTube options near the bottom of your email.

 

Online Email Marketing | Website Design

Emanager does more than improve the image and functionality of your website design; we set you up for marketing success on the web. From extracting the uniqueness of your brand, to helping you develop your marketing message, we bring your online marketing strategy to life.

Our online marketing practices will get your website found, noticed, and convert visitors into customers. Our SEO and SEM experts on staff spend hours making sure your website is found by potential customers. Build a successful online presence using social media platforms that include Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn and You Tube that communicate your message to your target audience in real time. Contact us to attend one of our workshops and stay ahead of the curve using social media platforms and other online marketing strategies that grow your business. Providing you with the best practices that improve online business all around, you’ll be well on your way to improving your bottom line.

 

Emanager
A Division of the Computer Company, Inc.
Website Design
info@tccwebinteractive.com
(800) 418 2358

Social Media…And What It Can Do For Your Business

July 28th, 2016 by eManagerSite No comments »

Social Media by eManagerSiteForming a good connection with your customers will guarantee that your customers will come back and continue to be satisfied with what your company offers. Using social media outlets can literally open up your company to a whole other corner of the market. This article has some great tips for you to get started!

A girl from my college had tweeted last semester that she wished there was something besides coffee that could allow her to stay up all night and study for her final exams. Red Bull happened to see her tweet soon after and offer her samples of their new products. When I heard about this from a friend, I was immediately impressed by Red Bull and was curious to see if their new line of drinks could help me focus and concentrate better during Finals Week. I’m sure the girl from my college also thought very positively of Red Bull being so proactive in advertising their product in a very human way.

-Like Red Bull, your interactions with customers online has to be personal. The tweets, Instagram photos, or Facebook statuses have to be able bring about an effect on your followers, friends, and fans. Make them laugh-link them to a funny video that ties in with your company’s mission statement. Make their heart ache a little by showing a sweet photo of a father and son, just in time for Father’s Day.

-See what’s trending online and post something about them. These posts will get a bit more attention than usual, so cash in!

-Promote your company – just try to be as creative as possible. A lot of promotions and advertisements are thinking quite literally outside the side ad boxes on popular websites.

It is not only big companies like Red Bull doing this. Notable celebrities like Taylor Swift and Rihanna are always posting on social media outlets, interacting with their fans in this way, and continuously promoting their image. Take a page from their book and do the same for your business.

-So be consistent with when you post on social media. Don’t post every day for a week and then stop for the next two weeks. Interact with customers and potential partners-be proactive like Red Bull! And stick to your brand!

-It’s also important to assign only one or two employees to update content on social media outlets. That way the updates will most likely stay focus and consistent with the brand your company is attempting to achieve. And like anything else practice makes perfect so letting one or two employees practice, they should become “Social Media Gurus” in no time!

Keep in mind that every one of these social media platforms are different. Some content on one platform might work great, on another platform they can fall flat.

– Re-post By Anna Fong, Web Design and Marketing Intern for eManagerSite (originally post in 2014)

Now is the Time for Mobile Websites… and Here’s Why.

July 27th, 2016 by TCC No comments »

Mobile Commerce and Engagement Stats

  • More than 56% of American adults are now smartphone owners.
  • 75 percent of Americans bring their phones to the bathroom.
  • Mobile now accounts for 12 percent of Americans’ media consumption time, triple its share in 2009.
  • 27% of companies worldwide planned to implement location-based marketing in 2015.
  • Of the 70 percent of shoppers who used a mobile phone while in a retail store during the holidays, 62 percent accessed that store’s site or app and only 37 percent of respondents accessed a competitor’s site or app..
  • Retailers’ apps with store mode gather five times more engagement.
  • Last year,only 12% of consumers bought anything through social media.
  • By the end of 2013, there will be more mobile devices on Earth than people.
  • The number of US mobile coupon users will rise from 12.3 million in 2010 to 53.2 million in 2014, driven by the rapid adoption of smartphones.
  • International media and marketing executives see mobile as the most disruptive force in their industry. 65% of U.S. shoppers research products and services on a PC and make a purchase in-store.
  • 48% use or would like to use a smartphone to shop while in-store or on the go.
  • 80% of smartphone owners want more mobile-optimized product information while they’re shopping in stores.
  • Nearly 50% of shoppers believe they are better informed than store associates.
  • iN five years, half of today’s smartphone users will be using mobile wallets as their preferred payments method.
  • Time spent with mobile apps starting to challenge television: consumers are spending 127 minutes per day in mobile apps–up 35 percent from 94 minutes a day in the same time last year–and spend 168 minutes watching television per day.
  • Mobile Searches related to restaurants have a conversion rate of 90% with 64% converting within the hour. By 2013,
  • three-quarters of Americans age 43 and under now use a smartphone
  • The smartphone market is now larger than the PC market. Smartphones outsold PCs in Q4 of 2014 101 million to 92 million

The Computer Company addresses a full range of marketing needs, including mobile ready apps, email,  content and social media marketing—creating a winning synergy that delivers  quantifiable results. Want a free no  obligation consultation with our experts

Contact us today:

the Computer Company, Inc

(860) 635-0500

(800) 418 2358

Posted by Don Thurber